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Volunteering in America

2018 Volunteering in America Report overview graphicrn

 

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Dear Friend of National Service,

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The fabric of our nation is strengthened by the service of its volunteers. We see this over and over again as ordinary Americans step up to support their fellow citizens for needs both great and small. This stands out in the results from our latest Volunteering in America study—a report that shows how Americans of all ages are serving together to keep our nation strong.

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We are excited to announce that the nation’s volunteer rate has jumped six points to 30 percent, making the American volunteer rate the highest it has ever been. Still, this is only part of the story.

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At the Corporation for National and Community Service, we understand the value of volunteering and the power it has to change people and communities for the better. Our differences fade away whenever we stand side-by-side to help others, and we learn that Americans have more in common than we are told.

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Giving back to our community is something we can all agree on – and taking this action is a powerful way to bring together Americans from all walks of life to build stronger, more equitable communities.

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Let’s look deeper into our Volunteering in America study results.

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  • More than 77.4 million Americans volunteered over 6.9 billion hours in 2017 (that means almost 1-in-3 Americans volunteered last year).
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  • There are tens of millions more “silent volunteers” who connect with their neighbors and friends to perform unheralded tasks that build community bonds by helping one another.
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  • This service has an estimated economic value of $167.0 billion. (Calculation based on Independent Sector’s estimate of the average value of a volunteer hour.)
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  • Civic engagement is the cornerstone of a strong nation. In the past 15 years, Americans have volunteered 120 billion hours, estimated to be worth $2.9 trillion.
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We call volunteers “Super Citizens,” and they have earned that title by setting an example others would be wise to follow.

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They help their neighbors twice as often as those who sit on the sidelines. They are joiners, belonging to groups or organizations at five times the rate of those who don’t volunteer. They donate to charity at twice the rate of the non-volunteer group and vote at 66 percent-higher rates.

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One of the best features of our report is the listing of the Top 10 states and cities for volunteering in America. Here are the top locations in this year’s study:

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Top 10 States in Volunteering

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  1. Utah
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  3. Minnesota
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  5. Oregon
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  7. Iowa
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  9. Alaska
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  11. Nebraska
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  13. District of Columbia
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  15. Montana
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  17. Maine
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  19. Idaho
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Top 10 Large Cities in Volunteering

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  1. Minneapolis St. Paul, MN
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  3. Rochester, NY
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  5. Salt Lake City, UT
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  7. Milwaukee, WI
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  9. Portland, OR
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  11. Indianapolis, IN
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  13. Pittsburgh, PA
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  15. Seattle, WA
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  17. Raleigh, NC
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  19. Baltimore, MD
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Looking at these communities and numbers only reinforces why we need volunteers now more than ever. That’s why we are asking all of you to do two things:

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  • Share this message, read our press release, and mobilize your networks to spread the word to #GoVolunteer.
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  • Make plans to turn 2019 into a year of volunteering to strengthen your families, your neighborhoods, and your nation.
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Volunteers are the backbone of our country, and we appreciate all the time they contribute to make their communities better.

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Warmest regards,

rnBarbara signaturern

Barbara Stewart
rnChief Executive Officer
rnCorporation for National and Community Service

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