Transform Arizona

8th Annual Luncheon, Transform Arizona - Change Agents in Action
Join us for a plated luncheon and interactive conversation on how grants professionals leverage their positions and skills around a set of principles and values to operationalize equity and amplify collaboration in philanthropy.

AZ Impact for Good is proud to announce the 8th annual Transform Arizona luncheon is back! Transform Arizona will be held at The Parsons Leadership Camp at South Mountain on Thursday, November 7, featuring a new theme, Courage in Practice. Join us for a plated luncheon featuring keynote speaker Dolores Estrada, Chief Operating Officer at PEAK Grantmaking.  

Transform Arizona’s topic is “Change Agents in Action.” 

Early Bird Discount ends October 9. Member and group discounts and nonprofit scholarships are available!

Keynote Speaker: Dolores Estrada, Chief Operating Officer at Peak Grantmaking

Schedule Overview

*Schedule is subject to change leading up to the event

A digital program will be provided leading up to the event via email.  

Expand Your Reach

Transform Arizona offers a unique opportunity to get your brand in front of Arizona’s nonprofit and philanthropic audience. Connect with professionals in the social sector uniquely with our sponsorship opportunities! Contact our Chief Impact Officer, Jennifer Purcell, jenniferp@azimpactforgood.org to find ways to share your products and services with nonprofit staff, board members, and volunteers. 

Thank you to our 2023 Sponsorship Partners

The Gacia Family Foundation

Salt River Project 

Savi Student Loan Workshop: Status Update on One-Time Debt Relief

Join this LIVE workshop and Q+A session with student loan experts to discuss the current status of One-Time Debt Relief.

The Supreme Court has officially blocked the Biden-Harris Administration’s One-Time Debt Relief program today, which means The Department of Education cannot proceed with issuing $10-20k in debt relief for borrowers. This news may be disappointing to your employees or members. There may still be other relief options available to them, like Public Service Loan Forgiveness. Savi is hosting a free webinar on Thursday, July 6th at 4pm ET to explain what this decision means for borrowers and to talk about the options they still have. Borrowers can register here. If you are looking for materials to promote this event, reach out to your Savi Account Manager. We’ll be covering:
  • What this decision means for borrowers
  • What other programs are still available to borrowers right now
  • How borrowers should prepare for payments resuming starting in October 2023
  • How Savi can help borrowers find the best options for their loans
 
For more information on our partnership with Savi, please click here.

Native American Charter School Struggles for Approval

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By State Library and Archives of Florida [No restrictions or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

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April 23, 2018; The Oklahoman (NewsOK)
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An attempt to found a charter school in Oklahoma has been turned down for a second time by the Oklahoma City School Board. It now heads to the state board of education.

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The proposed Sovereign Community School has been inspired by the Native American Community Academy (NACA) in New Mexico. NACA runs six schools devoted to Native students that incorporate their language, culture, and history into traditional curriculums. According to the Hechinger Report, NACA schools outperform many regular, nonnative schools, with 90 percent of the 2016 graduating class being accepted to college. The Oklahoma Gazette reports that “traditionally in the United States, Native American students as a group have the highest high school dropout rate and the lowest college enrollment rate in the country.”

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2014 Native Youth Report from the Executive Office of the President “repudiated federal policies regarding the education of Indian children are among those with a devastating and continuing effect on Native peoples…Education was at the center of many harmful policies because of its nexus with social and cultural knowledge. Education was—and remains—a critical vehicle for impacting the lives of Native youth for better or worse.”

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The Bureau of Indian Education runs its own schools, but graduation rates from BIE schools (53 percent) are lower even than those of Native students at traditional schools (67 percent), and far below the national average (80 percent). Another 2014 report, this one from the US Department of Education Office for Civil Rights, showed that Native children are suspended and expelled at higher rates than white children. These are the kinds of statistics that NACA and SCS aim to change. In addition, as Linda J. Ellwood pointed out for Indian Country Today, “78 percent of Native Americans live outside of reservations with 70 percent living in urban areas,” making charter networks outside reservations a crucial resource.

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Award-winning author Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz said that “absorbing racist and dehumanizing ideas about fellow classmates also diminishes the understanding and compassion of non-Native children, warping their conception of a history that often erases Native Americans altogether.” A charter network such as SCS proposes, which incorporates Native history and literature but welcomes children of any background, might combat this misconception.

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Gover’s school is tied to the New Mexican NACA network, which has been successfully expanding since 2006. He spent three years gathering community input from the community to draft the SCS proposal.

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“We are really frustrated that we couldn’t come to an agreement with the district…but it never felt like the district wanted to find that common ground,” he said.

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The state education board could review the charter’s application as early as June.—Erin Rubin

Solutions Summit – Spring 2018

Do you care about the state of education in your community or communities abroad? Join us for a day dedicated to crafting solutions for one of the most important challenges we face today!

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Changemaker Central Tempe Presents

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Solutions Summit

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Date: Saturday, Feb. 17, 2018

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Location: Student Pavilion – ASU Tempe Campus

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At this event, you will:

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  • Connect with knowledgeable experts
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  • Learn about local opportunities and resources
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  • Team up with fellow Changemakers.
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  • Create change, large and small, for the issues that you care about.
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Sign in or register to RSVP to this event

AZ Voters: Education is the top priority

AZ Voters: Education is the top priority

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A quick group selfie before Prescott High School holds their Commencement Ceremony for the Class of 2016 on May 27, 2016. (Les Stukenberg/The Daily Courier)

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Photo by Les Stukenberg.

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A quick group selfie before Prescott High School holds their Commencement Ceremony for the Class of 2016 on May 27, 2016. (Les Stukenberg/The Daily Courier)

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  • Originally Published: January 20, 2017 6 a.m.
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    Without a doubt, families in Arizona want a high-caliber education for their children, and want lawmakers to consider it a priority.

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    The rub is how that poll translates to dollars.

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    Will those same people who say education should be the state’s top priority agree to tax increases to pay for it, according to state and local educational leaders and advocates.

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    Expect More Arizona, a nonprofit educational advocacy group in Northern Arizona, conducted a poll through Public Opinion Strategies in December of 500 Arizona voters related to education issues. The overall result was that for the second year in a row residents have identified education as the most important issue facing this state — 43 percent — above immigration controls and job creation.

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    “We are encouraged to see such strong support from voters statewide for Arizona’s teachers and students,” said Erin Hart, chief operating officer for Expect More Arizona in a news release. “We look forward to working together with policy holders and elected officials to make education a top priority and to advance the preferences of Arizona voters.”

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    Yavapai County Schools Superintendent Tim Carter, vice president of the state Board of Education, said he has seen the polls and it certainly matches what he has heard from communities across the state.

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    “The bigger question is the issue of funding,” Carter said. “It’s easy for me to say I support public education. It’s more difficult for me to say I want my taxes raised to support it.”
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    He said there is no doubt in his mind that Arizona voters realize education is not adequately funded — Arizona is listed at about 49th of the 50 states in per-pupil educational funding. Voters clearly recognize that there is a “ripple effect” between those who earn a high-level education and those who do not when it comes to benefits to the state economy.

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    “I don’t think there is any doubt about it,” Carter said.

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    The issue boils down to whether or not voters are willing to prioritize education such that they are willing to be taxed more to pay for it, and will they elect lawmakers who support higher taxes for education, Carter said.

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    The Expect More Arizona poll showed that 84 percent of survey takers see educational funding as the state’s top priority, with 95 percent stating schools need more money to attract and retain the highest-caliber teachers.

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    The renewal of Prop 301, use of sales tax revenue to aid educational funding, earned 79 percent approval.

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    Arizona Education Progress Meter

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    Arizona

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    High school graduation: 76 percent

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    College bound — 50.5 percent

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    Third-grade reading — 40 percent

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    Preschool enrollment — 37 percent

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    Teacher pay — 75 percent of national average — Median elementary school teacher pay is $40,590 versus national average 54,120.

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    Yavapai County

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    High school graduation: 81 percent

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    College or post-secondary pursuits — 70 percent

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    Third-grade reading: 42 percent

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    Preschool enrollment — 64 percent

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    Source: Expect More Arizona and the Center for the Future of Arizona

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    Eighty percent agree that increasing the number of students who graduate from state or community colleges is critical to the economy, and 75 percent want to see more funding given to community colleges and universities to recruit students.

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    Other survey results suggested that every child needs access to a great teacher and principal – 89 percent; every child should receive the support they need to read at grade level by third grade – 87 percent; and 72 percent say every family who wants it should have access to high-quality early learning opportunities to support kindergarten readiness and literacy development.

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    Even with Gov. Doug Ducey’s plan to infuse about $114 million in education in the coming year, Carter said a focus remains on doing that without generating new taxes, Carter said.

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    “If that’s the view, then the likelihood of the state of Arizona … changing that dynamic is very small,” Carter said.

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    Budgeting boils down to three factors: if you want to spend more you can increase revenue, decrease spending elsewhere or a combination of both, Carter said.

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    “In the existing budget, there is only so much you can move around,” Carter said. “And I think the governor is trying to find ways within that parameter to fund education. But it still comes out to about $16 a student and that’s not going to move the needle at all.”

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    Prescott Unified Schools District Superintendent Joe Howard said the district works closely with Expect More Arizona and welcomes their advocacy aimed at convincing voters and lawmakers of the need to reprioritize, and properly fund, education in this state.

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    He said he is encouraged with Ducey’s latest budget proposal.

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    “I have great hope,” Howard said.

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    Carter, too, has optimism that lawmakers are being pushed to come up with new answers to the question of how best to elevate education in this state.

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    “Sooner or later, there will be an answer … and we’re going to do something different,” Carter said.

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    Link to original post: http://www.dcourier.com/news/2017/jan/20/az-voters-education-top-priority/