Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust Announces 2023 Class of Piper Fellows

Front Row:  Ryan Corry, Carmen Guerrero, Torrie Taj, Shelby Pedersen, Steve Zabilski (Piper Trust president and CEO).  Second Row:  David Roche, Kate Fassett, Matthew Kasper, Monique Lopez, Dr. Kris Volcheck. 

Nine Piper Fellows selected for their leadership and impact in Maricopa County—all receive Fellowships for study, reflection, and growth.

 

 

PHOENIX, Ariz.—Nine inspiring Maricopa County nonprofit leaders were selected for Piper Trust’s 2023 Class of Piper Fellows. The Fellows are:

  • Ryan Corry, chief philanthropy officer, The Society of St. Vincent de Paul (serves individuals and families in central and northern Arizona through facilities across the state; its main campus is located in South Phoenix).
  • Kate Fassett, chief advancement officer, Valleywise Health Foundation (serves predominantly the underserved population in Maricopa County, AZ; its world-renowned Diane and Bruce Halle Arizona Burn Center serves the entire Southwest region).
  • Carmen Guerrero, executive director, Cultural Coalition, Inc. (serves all of Maricopa County, AZ).
  • Matthew Kasper, artistic and general director, Phoenix Youth Symphony Orchestras (serves all of Maricopa County, AZ—with its youth musicians representing 61 ZIP codes).
  • Monique Lopez, chief operating officer, UMOM New Day Centers, Inc. (serves all of Maricopa County, AZ).
  • Shelby Pedersen, CEO, ICAN: Positive Programs for Youth (serves underserved communities in eastern Maricopa County, AZ, and specifically the downtowns of Chandler and Mesa).
  • David Roche, Dickey Family director and CEO, Heard Museum (located in Phoenix, AZ, and serves local, national, and international audiences).
  • Torrie A. Taj, CEO, Child Crisis Arizona (serves children, youth, and families through multiple locations in Phoenix and through statewide programs).
  • Kris Andrew Volcheck, DDS, founding president and CEO, Brighter Way Institute (located in downtown Phoenix and serves all of Maricopa County, AZ).

The newly selected class becomes part of the larger and enduring Piper Fellows network that is now a community of 111 Fellows. The 2023 Piper Fellows will participate in self-designed professional development “sabbaticals” focused on strengthening leadership skills and exploring renowned programs that can help nonprofits become more effective and resilient.

A Fellowship supports professional development, study, and travel for the Fellow, including an intentional respite activity that allows the Fellow to reflect on learnings. Additionally, the Fellowship supports related professional development for the staff and/or board of a Fellow’s organization. After completing the Fellowship, the Fellow is eligible to apply for an Organizational Enhancement Award to implement learning or programming that emerged as a result of the Fellow’s study. In total, a Piper Fellowship provides up to $90,000 in potential grant awards for a Fellow’s organization.

“Our commitment to supporting nonprofit leadership extends beyond financial contributions. By offering fellowship sabbaticals and access to the robust network of Piper Fellows, we aim to create a life-changing culture of care and empowerment within the sector,” said Steve Zabilski, president and CEO of Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust. “We envision a future where nonprofit executives can lead with vitality, embracing challenges with fresh perspectives and innovative solutions.”

The 2023 Piper Fellows applications were reviewed and selected for recommendation by an external committee, this year comprised of: Darlene Newsom (2011 Piper Fellow; founder of Newsom Nonprofit Consulting), Edmundo Hidalgo (2008 Piper Fellow; community advocate and nonprofit consultant), Julia Patrick (CEO and founder, American Nonprofit Academy), and Brian Spicker (president and CEO, Maricopa Community College District Foundation).

“I was awarded a Piper Fellowship when I was CEO of Chicanos Por La Causa,” said Edmundo Hidalgo, a 2008 Piper Fellow and now community advocate and nonprofit consultant. “The Fellowship gave me the opportunity to dream and think strategically—it was a transformational springboard that helped take me and my organization to the next level. I still draw on the experience today and remain active in the Piper Fellows community,” Hildago said.

Applications will open for the 2024 Class of Piper Fellows in spring 2024.

About Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust:

Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust supports organizations that enrich health, well-being, and opportunity for the people of Maricopa County, Arizona. Since it began awarding grants in 2000, Piper Trust has invested more than $717 million in local nonprofits and programs. Piper Trust grantmaking areas are healthcare and medical research, children, older adults, arts and culture, education, and religious organizations. For more information, visit pipertrust.org | X/Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn. For Piper Trust’s Annual Financial Report: Fiscal Year Ending March 2022, visit FY2022

Media Contact:

Karen Leland, kleland@pipertrust.org | 480-556-7125
Chief Communications Officer, Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust

Want to spotlight your next announcement? Contact us for more info! Marketing@azimpactforgood.org

Transform Arizona

8th Annual Luncheon, Transform Arizona - Change Agents in Action
Join us for a plated luncheon and interactive conversation on how grants professionals leverage their positions and skills around a set of principles and values to operationalize equity and amplify collaboration in philanthropy.

AZ Impact for Good is proud to announce the 8th annual Transform Arizona luncheon is back! Transform Arizona will be held at The Parsons Leadership Camp at South Mountain on Thursday, November 7, featuring a new theme, Courage in Practice. Join us for a plated luncheon featuring keynote speaker Dolores Estrada, Chief Operating Officer at PEAK Grantmaking.  

Transform Arizona’s topic is “Change Agents in Action.” 

Early Bird Discount ends October 9. Member and group discounts and nonprofit scholarships are available!

Keynote Speaker: Dolores Estrada, Chief Operating Officer at Peak Grantmaking

Schedule Overview

*Schedule is subject to change leading up to the event

A digital program will be provided leading up to the event via email.  

Expand Your Reach

Transform Arizona offers a unique opportunity to get your brand in front of Arizona’s nonprofit and philanthropic audience. Connect with professionals in the social sector uniquely with our sponsorship opportunities! Contact our Chief Impact Officer, Jennifer Purcell, jenniferp@azimpactforgood.org to find ways to share your products and services with nonprofit staff, board members, and volunteers. 

Thank you to our 2023 Sponsorship Partners

The Gacia Family Foundation

Salt River Project 

The Nonprofit Sector: Looking at the Bigger Picture

Written by: Natasha Lopez-Rodriquez, , MBA – Director of Capacity Building & Education.

As leaders in our organizations, we are constantly looking at the bigger picture in running a successful nonprofit. Many see the nonprofit industry as a mythical world or not a real business. Some believe that nonprofit leaders do not really understand business concepts like management, accounting, sales, and marketing. However, that is far from the truth, so let us set the record straight.

Nonprofit Management – Nonprofit leaders are experts at being creative and innovative because we do not always have the latest technology or deep payroll budgets at our fingertips. With these experiences, we have learned to be compassionate servant leaders, directing teams of highly passionate and capable individuals. It has taught us to manage teams of employees who are following great causes and leadership, not a paycheck. These experiences teach us to work in unity, collaborate internally towards a common purpose, and strengthen our skills to collaborate outside our own organization to do more together by combining resources.

 

Nonprofit Accounting – We understand financial statements, budgeting, forecasting, and revenue and expense management. We are great stewards of others’ money and have strong accountability, making sure every dollar is spent in an efficient and effective manner. Nonprofits strive to have the largest amount of revenue just like their for-profit counterparts. The biggest difference is that nonprofits put most of those funds back into their causes.

 

Nonprofit Sales and Marketing – As nonprofits, we do have products to sell, such as clean water for children, shelter for families, job placement services, education, entertainment, and more.  However, those that buy the products are not necessarily the ones who ultimately benefit from the products. We are skilled at selling products, services, AND passion to donors. Nonprofit leaders are storytellers, displaying the cause in action to the point where others feel compelled to join in. Internal communication and external communication are vital. We put common messages into the community via public relations and have become fundraising experts through our events and social media. Our brand is everything, just like it is for our for-profit counterparts.

 

All of these examples show how nonprofits are real businesses and nonprofit leaders are experienced and capable leaders. Your organizations are providing excellent client experiences, with aligned processes that are meeting short- and long-term goals just like a for-profit agency. Never forget how vital our sector is to the community at large. Look into 2023 with a positive outlook and one that has an exciting door to open and walk through.

How Do You Lead?

Leaders: What Do You Think About…How You Lead?

 

Leadership is influencing others to act. Leaders do the right things. Managers do things right. Professional leaders do both. Authority to lead comes from at least 4 overlapping sources:

  1. Position: Decide, reward, hire, fire
  2. Expertise: Knowledge, skill, experience
  3. Personal: Likeability, persuasiveness
  4. Threat: Punish, coerce, intimidate

Allocate 100 points among these 4 sources. How much of each comprises your leadership authority? How might you rebalance these sources?

Here are the Taylor Systems 10 leadership competency sets (not in any order):

  1. Leading Successful Change
  2. Communicating, Presenting Persuasively
  3. Being Credible, Acting with Integrity
  4. Leading Sustainable Inclusion, Diversity, Equity
  5. Building Positive Interpersonal Relationships
  6. Developing Current, Future Leaders
  7. Leading Productive, Profitable Operations
  8. Demonstrating Professional Knowledge, Skills
  9. Successfully Planning, Executing Strategy
  10. Engaging the Workforce

How qualified are you in each competency set? (1 low – 10 high)

My top three competencies for 2022:

  1. Engaging the Workforce
  2. Leading Successful Change
  3. Developing Current, Future Leaders

What are your 1-3 most urgent development, improvement priorities? I hope these thoughts help new leaders gain understanding, and seasoned leaders refresh thinking, add insight, perspective. One final thing to think about…What is your mission, purpose as a leader?

I’d like to help you develop, improve your leadership. Please call or write. Everett Taylor, PhD Recover – Uncover – Discover Leadership Coach, Consultant, Trainer & Advisor Taylor Systems Executive Coaching, LLC

Phone: 480-720-9065

Web: https://taylorsystemscoaching.com/

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/EvTaylorPhD

Three Easy Ways to Attract & Retain People… Listen, Inform, Care

Three Easy Ways to Attract & Retain People… Listen, Inform, Care

Re-engaging and attracting new “talent” can be simple and low-cost propositions, even in these overwhelming times. The most important factor in resolving the Great Resignation, or talent outflow, is to provide engaging experiences to your workforce. People are motivated to join, stay or come back when they experience a nurturing, engaging, fair workplace. They will encourage friends to come aboard.

Here are three engaging and disengaging experiences that motivate people to stay or leave, apply or not, engage or not. The neat thing is that providing these positive experiences is a very low-cost, low energy proposition.

  • ENGAGING EXPERIENCE #1: BEING HEARD Leaders listen to my frustrations, fears, suggestions. They don’t debate, explain away, argue or share their own thoughts. They simply listen, perhaps clarify. They suspend their urgency to solve, to take quick action, to move on in their busy schedule. As a result of being heard, I believe that my what I say matters. I am important in this employer. I’d like to stay here!
  • DISENGAGING EXPERIENCE #1: NOT BEING HEARD Leaders are so busy that they don’t take the time listen to my frustrations, fears, suggestions. They listen” impatiently to debate, explain away, argue or share their own thoughts. They want to quickly solve, take action, move on in their busy schedule. As a result of not being heard, I believe that my opinions just don’t matter…I am not important in this agency. Why shouldn’t I look for a better place to work?
  • ENGAGING EXPERIENCE #2: BEING INFORMED Leaders tell me about what’s happening and when I’ll know what’s happening…to me, my team, the agency. I understand our problems, progress and successes. Leaders are available to talk. They regularly present overviews. They share details, as and when appropriate. They are transparent. As a result of being informed, I believe am valued here…I understand things that affect my job security. It feels real good to work here!
  • DISENGAGING EXPERIENCE #2: NOT BEING INFORMED I have no idea about what’s happening and when I’ll know what’s happening…to me, my team, the agency. I don’t understand our problems – except through the rumor mill. Leaders are not available to talk. They never communicate the big picture or the details. As a result of not being informed, I believe I am not important here. I am anxious about my job and paycheck. I need to leave asap?
  • ENGAGING EXPERIENCE #3: BEING CARED FOR Leaders don’t just say that they care – they show it. I am cared for. Leaders respect and show compassion for me. They touch my heart with small, unexpected acts of caring like sharing a meal, writing a note of condolence, praise or gratitude. As a result of being cared for, I believe that my experience is important here…I feel nurtured. Why would I want to leave here?
  • DISENGAGING EXPERIENCE #3: NOT BEING CARED FOR Leaders just say that they care – they don’t show it. They pass me in the hallway without making eye contact. I doubt that they even know my name. They’re so wrapped up in their own stuff that they have no idea of what I’m going through. As a result of not being cared for, I believe that I’m a nobody here…I feel abandoned. I’m out of here!

If you want to learn more… Partners In Leadership teaches that experiences lead to beliefs; beliefs lead to actions; and actions produce results. Look into their publications “The Oz Principle” and “Change the Culture, Change the Game.” (https://www.partnersinleadership.com)

The Gallup “Q12” assessment and research provides a gold-standard system for measuring and improving employee engagement to attract, and retain talented people. Check out their “The 12 Elements of Great Managing” (https://news.gallup.com/businessjournal/104197/first-element-great-managing.aspx).

I hope these thoughts help. If you think I might be of more help with your work, career, team or organization, schedule a value-added, free-of-charge conversation & verbal assessment.

Everett Taylor, PhD Leadership Coach, Consultant, Trainer, Advisor, Speaker


Phone: 480-720-9065
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/EvTaylorPhD 

Nonprofit leaders…are you sufficiently in touch with of your impact on the people you lead?

Nonprofit leaders…are you sufficiently in touch with of your impact on the people you lead? 

Do you understand how people see you, your moods and behavior?

 

Now is the precise moment time for nonprofit leaders to take a look at their emotional intelligence (EI). EI involves a set of skills that help leaders perceive, understand, express, reason with, and manage emotions – both their own and others’. EI is a critical leadership competency to leading self and others out of the pandemic exhaustion into strength and resilience. Leaders need to be in touch with their feelings and motivations if they’re to be able to lead others.

High EI leaders are:

  • Self-aware, live in the moment
  • Aware of others, empathetic
  • Authentic and genuine

High EI leaders:

  • Have strong emotional reasoning
  • Manage their own behavior well
  • Positively manage, motivate and empower others.

Leaders with high EI can clearly identify strengths and opportunities. They see their impact on others. They have good insight into the experiences, needs and motivations of their teams. High EI leaders demonstrate the positive energy necessary to drive organizations forward. The good news is that emotional intelligence can be developed, improved. It’s the oxygen mask that you put on yourself so that you can take care of those around you. It’s the mirror, gently showing you have you’ve actually behaved, been perceived by your team. I’d like to work with you to improving your emotional intelligence. It only takes 4 hours of your time to set up and conduct a 360-degree EI assessment, feedback and development plan. Give me a call.

Ev Taylor, PhD Leadership Coach, Consultant, Trainer, Advisor everett@taylorsystemscoaching.com 480-720-9065

A Successful C-Suite Shift Needs a Good Communications Plan

by Christine McEntree, FASAE and Laura Van Eperen | 2.14.22 | ASAE Center

Click here for link to original article.

 

A clear communications plan should be an integral part of any C-Suite transition to make sure there are no surprises and the change in leadership goes off without a hitch. A former CEO and a communications expert offer their advice. 

In 2019, we had firsthand experience planning and developing a communications approach for handling Christine’s leadership transition from CEO and executive director at the American Geophysical Union. Based on our experience successfully organizing this planned CEO transition, we have some tips for other associations.

The departure of a key leader through a planned transition, a sudden event, or a board of directors’ decision to make a change is a significant transitional event in the life of any organization. While the steps for phasing out one leader to selecting and onboarding a new one have many moving parts, too often proper communication planning is an afterthought, which can lead to confusion, uncertainty, and less efficient change management.

Here are some real-life scenarios to demonstrate why communications planning is integral to effective transitions:

 

  • The CEO informs the board of their departure, and the board selects a search firm. The start of the search and the search firm is publicly announced, and yet staff and key stakeholders have not yet been informed of the departure and the search. That raises many questions, which can lead to speculation and rumors.
  • The CEO is informed by the board that their contract will not be renewed. The board announces a search and search firm without informing the CEO. The board continues the search without any updates about the search status to the outgoing CEO, leaving they unable to answer basic questions from staff and key stakeholders.
  • The board and CEO agree to a departure date. A search firm is selected, and the search begins. However, the board chair does not keep the board or membership informed of the status of the search, or when the board will select and announce the incoming CEO.   

 A well-developed communication plan for any major announcement is essential to be fully prepared to manage the narrative, ensure the best outcome for the transition, and pass the baton from one CEO to the next. When key personnel departures are done well, the communication elements—from the announcement, through to the onboarding of the new leadership professional—present many beneficial opportunities, including supporting the change-management process and positioning the organization for new and future success.

 

Key personnel, personal, and organizational factors must be considered. Thinking through communication steps with various scenarios will help anticipate problems and help plan for the appropriate action to take for each situation. We have found that a comprehensive communication framework must map out who, when, where, and how to share the transitional news with a variety of factors considered to account for a change in course. The framework can be outlined in a leadership transition communication plan.

 

A well-developed communication plan for any major announcement is essential to be fully prepared to manage the narrative, ensure the best outcome for the transition, and pass the baton from one CEO to the next.

Here are additional communication elements and guidance for board chairs, CEOs, and communications professionals:

 

 

  • The communication begins the moment the CEO informs the board chair they are departing. In preparation for that conversation, the CEO develops an outline of key messages that they want to convey regarding their reasons and the selected departure date. These early messages will inform the foundation of the messaging and communications throughout the search process.
  • The CEO and board chair jointly develop a plan and key message points for informing the board officers and board of directors, the expected timeline for the search process, and key date ranges during the process when key stakeholders—including the departing CEO—will be informed of the status of the search and who is conducting it.
  • The CEO and board chair engage a communications expert (internal, external, or both) to assist with the development of the communications plan.

The key elements of the communication plan for major announcements typically include goals and objectives, strategies, key messages, stakeholders, a timetable to inform stakeholders and keep them informed as appropriate during the search, and announcement copy for internal and external communication audiences and channels.

 

Additionally, a planning team that includes the CEO, board chair, and communication expert needs to develop their own communication schedule to touch base regularly with updates, feedback, and to review the draft communication plan and adjust it as needed.

 

After the initial department announcement, the board leadership should develop a schedule for providing regular updates to the entire board and from the CEO to the staff. To more effectively handle incoming questions and messages about the departure and search process, it is a good idea to establish an email, a dedicated phone number, and a person responsible for triaging and responding to the messages.

 

On the traditional and social media front, a communication professional needs to be dedicated to monitoring and responding to any inquiries or online conversations with prepared messaging on the issue.

 

A thoughtful communications plan should be a part of any C-Suite transition to keep everyone informed and to minimize uncertainty and confusion. Our experience taught us that careful planning and transparency go a long way toward achieving a successful shift in leadership, easing the departure of the outgoing CEO and the arrival of the new CEO.  

 

 

About The Authors

 

Christine McEntee, FASAE, is former CEO and executive director of the American Geophysical Union in Washington, DC.

 

Laura Van Eperen is CEO and cofounder of FOVNDRY, a communications consulting firm in Rockville, Maryland.

 

The Great Re-Engagement… Listen, Inform, Care

Re-engaging and attracting new “talent” can be simple and low-cost propositions, even in these overwhelming times. The most important factor in resolving the Great Resignation, or talent outflow, is to provide engaging experiences to your workforce. People are motivated to join, stay or come back when they experience a nurturing, engaging, fair workplace. They will encourage friends to come aboard. Here are three engaging and disengaging experiences that motivate people to stay or leave, apply or not, engage or not. The neat thing is that providing these positive experiences is a very low-cost, low energy proposition.

ENGAGING EXPERIENCE #1: BEING HEARD Leaders listen to my frustrations, fears, suggestions. They don’t debate, explain away, argue or share their own thoughts. They simply listen, perhaps clarify. They suspend their urgency to solve, to take quick action, to move on in their busy schedule. As a result of being heard, I believe that, by understanding my opinions and needs. I am important in this employer. I’d like to stay here!

DISENGAGING EXPERIENCE #1: NOT BEING HEARD Leaders are so busy that they don’t take the time listen to my frustrations, fears, suggestions. They listen” impatiently to debate, explain away, argue or share their own thoughts. They want to quickly solve, take action, move on in their busy schedule. As a result of not being heard, I believe that my opinions and needs just don’t matter…I am not important in this agency. Why shouldn’t I look for a better place to work?

ENGAGING EXPERIENCE #2: BEING INFORMED Leaders tell me about what’s happening and when I’ll know what’s happening…to me, my team, the agency. I understand our problems, progress and successes. Leaders are available to talk. They regularly present overviews. They share details, as and when appropriate. They are transparent. As a result of being informed, I believe am valued here…I understand things that affect my job security. It feels real good to work here!

DISENGAGING EXPERIENCE #2: NOT BEING INFORMED I have no idea about what’s happening and when I’ll know what’s happening…to me, my team, the agency. I don’t understand our problems – except through the rumor mill. Leaders are not available to talk. They never communicate the big picture or the details. As a result of not being informed, I believe I am not important here. I am anxious about my job and paycheck. I need to leave asap?

ENGAGING EXPERIENCE #3: BEING CARED FOR Leaders don’t just say that they care – they show it. I am cared for. Leaders respect and show compassion for me. They touch my heart with small, unexpected acts of caring like sharing a meal, writing a note of condolence, praise or gratitude. As a result of being cared for, I believe that I am cared for…I feel nurtured. Why would I want to leave here?

DISENGAGING EXPERIENCE #3: NOT BEING CARED FOR Leaders just say that they care – they don’t show it. They pass me in the hallway without making eye contact. I doubt that they even know my name. They’re so wrapped up in their own stuff that they have no idea of what I’m going through. As a result of not being cared for, I believe that I’m not important here…I feel abandoned. I’m out of here!

If you want to learn more… Partners In Leadership teaches that experiences lead to beliefs; beliefs lead to actions; and actions produce results. Look into their publications “The Oz Principle” and “Change the Culture, Change the Game.” (https://www.partnersinleadership.com The Gallup “Q12” assessment and research provides a gold-standard system for measuring and improving employee engagement to attract, and retain talented people. Check out their “The Elements of Great Managing” https://www. (12 elements of great managing gallup.com).

I hope these thoughts help. If you think I might be of more help with your work, career, team or organization, schedule a value-added, free-of-charge conversation & verbal assessment. Everett Taylor, PhD – Executive & Leadership Coach Phone: 480-720-9065

Regain and Strengthen Your Professional Resilience

Regain and Strengthen Your Professional Resilience

rnrn

September 1, 2021

rnrn

 

rnrn

The pandemic stress isn’trnabating.  People are exhausted, anxious,rndepressed, burnt-out. Here’s my take onrnhow to strengthen your resiliency in the face of constant stress.

rnrn

 

rnrn

Ongoing dis-stressrnleads to work and personal burnout.

rnrn

The burn-out cycle beginsrnwith positive stress(eustress) from factors such as commitment to new job, highrnproductivity…but the brain still registers it as stress. Then it moves to somernoccasional physical, emotional or intellectual stress signals…lack of focus,rnirritability, anxiety.  The intensity ofrnsymptoms comes with chronic stress…illness, apathy, anger. 

rnrn

 

rnrn

The big “B” – Burnout. 

rnrn

You’ve exceeded yourrncapacity to cope, to rebound.  Thernsymptoms have become persistent, continual…chronic health problems, withdrawalrnfrom family and work, cynicism.  You needrnhelp here from family, friends or clinical providers to recover, to keep thisrnstate from becoming fixed, life-altering. rn

rnrn

 

rnrn

What’s the fix?

rnrn

The first solution is tornget on top of the cycle at the very first stage.  Start then to intentionally build habits andrnpractices which will strengthen your vitality and resilience in the face of thernoverwhelming impacts of a pandemic, changes at work, career doubts, etc.  Once you’re at the 2nd or 3rdrnstage, you’re digging yourself out of the hole instead of building a bridgernover it.

rnrn

 

rnrn

Only YOU can fix it?

rnrn

Guess what?!  No-one but you can ultimately prevent or fixrnthese problems.  Friends, family,rnclinical providers can help.  But thernreal fix for what’s ailing you comes from…you! rnIf you don’t own the problem and solution, what others say and do tornhelp will be wasted.  You have to bernaccountable for preventing burnout and regaining your resilience.

rnrn

 

rnrn

A DIY project guide

rnrn

A good change processrnalways starts with an assessment.  Takernjust a few minutes to rank-order the importance of the followingrnwellness factors.  Then identify yourrncurrent greatest strength & the leverage factorrnthat, if improved, will help improve the other factors…your “Plus/Delta.”

rnrn

 

rnrn

Sixrnresilience-strengthening factors.

rnrn

1.    rnEmotional: In touch with your feelings? Do they surprisernyou?  What do others say?

rnrn

2.    rnIntellectual:  Are yournstudying anything?  Regularlyrnlearning?  Developing new skills? 

rnrn

3.    rnPhysical: Eatingrnwell?  Are you walking regularly?  Working out? How’s your heart?

rnrn

4.    rnRe-creational:  Do you playrnor listen to music?  Read?  Do or enjoy art? Have fun?

rnrn

5.    rnRelational:  How’s yourrnfamily life?  Do you still see yourrnfriends?  Making new friends?

rnrn

6.    rnSpiritual:  Do you relaternto a higher being, whatever your tradition? rnMeditate?  Pray?

rnrn

 

rnrn

Solving the problem(s)

rnrn

As in many areas of life,rnonce you’ve defined the problem, you can define the opportunity.  The problem becomes much easier to solve. Yourncan develop a plan of action that is as important to you and your work as any businessrnstrategy or operation.  Here are somernsuggestions for regaining your resilience…your ability to rebound & recoverrnfrom physical, emotional and professional exhaustion.

rnrn

 

rnrn

In this DIY process, yournmust be intentional about strengthening yourself if you are to bernsuccessful.  Habits & routines willrnneed to be altered.  Set small,rnincremental change goals.  Ground the newrnhabit.  Then go onto the next…& sornforth.  Find a change buddy who willrnsupport & remind.  Keep a chart. Dornwhatever works for you to start & sustain positive change.

rnrn

 

rnrn

So let’s be specific

rnrn

When I was in the Army, werndid the “Daily Dozen” physical exercise. rnHere’s my daily dozen resilience-strengthening exercises.  Start with just one…then add to it & addrnto that.  Regularly practice each one forrn3 weeks & it’ll be yours! Soonrnyou’ll be working the entire set on a daily basis.

rnrn

1.    rnCenter before starting your day.  How are you feeling?  What are today’s goals?

rnrn

2.    rnBreath.  4rncounts in…pause…3 counts out…pause. Build the skill for stressful moments.

rnrn

3.    rnHave anrnattitude of gratitude. Set a fixed time each day to list yourrnblessings.

rnrn

4.    rnMove…take a few minutes each hour to get up from your deskrnto stretch, wander.

rnrn

5.    rnFind thernrhythm…between thinking and doing,rnpeople and data, intensity and relaxation

rnrn

6.    rnControl therncalendar.  Be meeting skeptical.  Don’t blindly accept others’ priorities.

rnrn

7.    rnTake refreshingrnbreaks. Lunch to relax, relate…or getrnaway. Take walking meetings.

rnrn

8.    rnRe-create.  Find, get backrnto a non-work hobby, activity which engages, energizes you.

rnrn

9.    rnLearn one newrnthing each day…one fact…one smallrnsoftware skill…one insight.

rnrn

10.  Be especially kind to at least one person…each day. rnBoth of you will feel better.

rnrn

11.  Own your attitude…your feelings, how you show up. Find humor, at least withrnyourself. 

rnrn

12.  Harmonize work & life.  Gently blend workrnand home, rather than severely separate.

rnrn

 

rnrn

I hope these thoughtsrnhelp.  If you think I might be of morernhelp with your work, career, team or organization, schedule a free-of-chargernconversation & assessment.  Call me at 480-720-9065 or email mernat  everett@taylorsystemscoaching.com  rn

rnrn

 

rnrn

Ev Taylor, PhD -rnExecutive & Leadership Coach

rnrn

Certified Executive Coachrn- Center for Executive Coaching

rnrn

Certified EmotionalrnIntelligence Practitioner – Genos International

rnrn

Certified ProfileXT,rnProfiles Sales Assessment & Profiles Managerial Fit User – ProfilesrnInternational

rnrn

Member: InternationalrnCoach Federation

rnrn

Member:  Alliance of Arizona Nonprofits

Jim Collins Didn’t Think Leadership Was Important to a Company’s Success. Here’s Why He Changed His

by Christine Lagorio-Chafkin | Inc. Magazine

Jim Collins.

While working on his first two books about businesses that scaled to great heights, Jim Collins found that the executives responsible for leading America’s most successful ventures possessed a wide range of characteristics–everything from brashness to introversion; some were wildly creative while others were disciplined. That’s why by the time he was working on his third book, which would become the bestselling business bible, Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap … and Others Don’the’d become convinced that leadership wasn’t a determining factor in a company’s long-term success. Fortunately for him, he had by that time founded his management company in Boulder, Colorado, and there had surrounded himself with a crew of younger researchers. He benefited greatly from their ability to challenge his thinking. Collins explains. –As told to Christine Lagorio-Chafkin

 

WHEN WE WERE doing research for my third book, Good to Great, I was dubious of anything having to do with “leadership.” I had long believed that if you observe a successful company over time, you find its success is not the result of a single leader. As extraordinary as Steve Jobs was, Apple has succeeded beyond him–meaning it’s ultimately about building a company that doesn’t depend on a single leader, right? The founders of our country understood that. So I was deeply skeptical of studying leadership at all.

 

But my research team revolted. They told me that, in studying the inflections of companies that went from “good” to “great,” it was clear the leader played a big role. I said, “Well, let’s go to our comparison companies that didn’t make it. Some have towering, charismatic leadership but didn’t make that good-to-great leap. Leadership is an irrelevant variable.”

 

Again, my team fought back, marshaling evidence and arguing that the critical element is the source of the leader’s ambition. Is that leader truly ambitious for the cause, and the company, and the work–not for him- or herself? That will show up in their actions, regardless of personality. Look at Anne Mulcahy of Xerox and Katharine Graham of The Washington Post. They have vastly different personalities, but both showed ambition for a bigger cause when taking over their companies during tough times. In the end, I’m happy to admit my team was right: Great leadership, in its many personality packages, matters a lot.

Click here to view original article.